Ali Znaidi

A Brief Historiographical Study of Pokémons 

 

All the world is a PokéStop, and all the men 

and women merely Pokémons. 

Pokémons hunting each others. 

When you make your entrance into life, 

they give you a name, in fact, a game account. 

Then you create and customize your own avatar. 

Once created, your avatar is displayed 

on a map using your current geographical location, 

in fact your identity. 

This world is a PokéStop. 

You come here and collect items, 

in fact, hunt items and other Pokémons. 

Focusing on the game, you get lost. 

Thus you forget about that agonized ant 

in that nuclear plant, that candle between 

the havoc wrought by an earthquake, 

that toddler’s sandal in the mud; that scandal. 

Go/ogle your prey! Go, go! 

After all, life is a game, a competition, 

and all weak Pokémons become the game. 

This world is a PokéStop 

where utopia and the abyss become interchangeable terms. 

Focusing on the game, 

you view your prey in augmented reality mode 

on your mobile device, in fact, on the bedroom of your eyes. 

Go, go! Nothing is totally real. Nothing is totally virtual. 

Go, go! Everything is a game. 

Don’t forget that the word ‘game’ is polysemic!

A Chimera of a Rainbow

            

When the body loses its GPS 

the sun’s rays seem almost redundant 

& the words & the scars.

The experience of loss is something akin 

to a bohemian taking a bite off the rainbow

despite the lack of dental hygiene.

Colours only find a home in his migraine 

like raindrops in the rain song.

—Nomadic representations of a body,

or an imagination of a silhouette? 

Center? This is not a center.

—There’s nothing special in a navel.

At the edge of the sky, 

there’s another chimera of a rainbow.

Ali Znaidi (b.1977) lives in Redeyef, Tunisia. He is the author of several chapbooks, including Experimental Ruminations (Fowlpox Press, 2012), Moon’s Cloth Embroidered with Poems (Origami Poems Project, 2012), Bye, Donna Summer! (Fowlpox Press, 2014), Taste of the Edge (Kind of a Hurricane Press, 2014), Mathemaku x5 (Spacecraft Press, 2015), and Austere Lights (Locofo Chaps: an imprint of Moria Books, 2017).  

© 2018 Colin Herd and all the individual poets

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